Infographics Project IV – Quality of Life I

The new project the Infographics Projects concerns the quality of life of the citizens of the European Union (hereinafter EU), which can be defined as the degree in which an individual is healthy and can participate in life events. Academic interest in quality of life began to rise after the end of World War II when there was a growing awareness and recognition of social inequalities. Quality of life is assessed using two different methods of measurement. More specifically, quality of life is assessed objectively through the use of economic, social, and health indicators and subjectively through questionnaires to citizens who capture the extent to which their needs are met. Ιn the “Infographics Project – Quality of Life”, both the objective indicators and the perspective of the EU citizens will be analyzed in the sectors of the economy, society, and health, on the basis of which their quality of life is assessed. The analysis will focus on the comparative course and position of Greece in relation to the other EU member states, while through it the margins for further improvement in the quality of life of European citizens will be highlighted.
In the first issue the quality of employment will be analyzed through the following indicators: “ Level of job satisfaction of the working population (Job Satisfaction), employees hours working per week (Employees Long Working Hours), as well as the difference of working hours between employed and self-employed (Self-employed persons with employees (employers) Long working Hours’) and the proportion of low-wage employees to total employees (excluding interns).
The indicator “Level of job satisfaction of the working population” depicts the percentage of the population of each E.U. member state, rating their job satisfaction as High, Medium, or Low. For 2018, Greece recorded medium job satisfaction among its majority of the working population, with 58.3%, while the country showcased the second-highest percentage, with 29.6% of the working population, having low job satisfaction as well as the lowest percentage of high job satisfaction, with 12.1%, in comparison with the other EU member-states. It is noteworthy to mention that Finland was the country with the highest percentage [41.4%] of high job satisfaction, on the contrary Bulgaria recorded the highest percentage of low job satisfaction in E.U. with a percentage of 36.6%. Regarding the EU as a whole, the majority of its population recorded medium job satisfaction, more specifically 58.5% of the working population, while high job satisfaction in this indicator noted as 24.6% of E.U. ‘s working population.
The indicator “Employees Long Working Hours” refers to the percentage of employees that work weekly, in their main job, for at least 49 hours. In 2020, Greece recorded the 8th highest percentage [4.5%], in comparison with the rest of the E.U. member states, yet presenting a 31.82% decrease from 2015. Cyprus was the country with the highest percentage in this indicator, with a rate of 8.5%, while the Netherlands recorded the lowest percentage at a rate of 0.3%. Regarding the variations from 2015 to 2020, Hungary was the country recording the highest decrease, at a rate of 61.11%, ranging from 3.6% in 2015 to 1.4% in 2020, while Lithuania recorded the highest increase, at a rate of 50%. The E.U., as a whole for 2020 recorded a percentage of 3.8%. It is noteworthy to mention that in 2015 this percentage was 4.9%, so a significant decrease of 22.45% was noted.
Greece, in 2020, in the indicator that measures the difference in the percentages of self-employed and employees who worked on average over 49 hours, recorded a percentage of 47.2%, with self-employed working at a rate of 51.7% and employees at a rate of 4.5%. Belgium had the biggest difference in this indicator, with the self-employed working at a rate of 59.6% and employees at a rate of 4%. It is worth mentioning that E.U., as a whole, recorded percentages of 43.8% for self-employed and 3.8% for employees.
Regarding the indicator that refers to the Proportion of low-wage employees to total employees (excluding interns), in 2018, Greece recorded a percentage of 19.65%, presenting a decrease from 2014, thus occupying the 9th highest position in comparison with the rest of E.U. member-states, while E.U., as a whole, recorded a percentage of 15.22%.

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